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A royal visit at a time of reckoning: Will Prince Charles and Camilla connect with Canadians?

3-day tour kicks off Tuesday in St. John's, before the couple travels to Ottawa, N.W.T

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Prince Charles and Camilla are set to kick off their three-day royal tour across Canada in St. John’s on Tuesday, which will include a moment of reflection and prayer dedicated to victims of residential schools at a garden outside Government House.

Kyle Empringham doesn't follow the royals and wasn't initially aware there was a royal visit to Canada coming up this week.

Still, after he found out, the co-founder of The Starfish Canada, a group that supports young people in their environmental careers, saw potential for some "optimistic skepticism" about what might flow environmentally from the visit by Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, that kicks off Tuesday in St. John's.

Environmental issues are on the agenda during the three-day trip, including when Charles meets with local experts to discuss the impact of climate change in the Northwest Territories, and Indigenous-led efforts to address it.

Empringham, who co-founded Starfish as a 20-year-old in 2010, said he was glad to hear that Charles is visiting the North, and that he would be engaging with Indigenous communities.

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Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, visit Canada House in London, England, last Thursday, ahead of their three-day visit to Canada that kicks off Tuesday in St. John's. (Hannah McKay/The Associated Press)

"Then next thing I'd want to hear is … the actionable pieces; that it's not just a visit for a photo," Empringham said in an interview.

"I would be excited to hear that there are actionable items that are going to move forward, or maybe move forward quicker than what's comfortable. Those are the things that often we don't hear enough of."

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Prince Charles and Camilla arrive at Canada House in London last Thursday. (Hannah McKay/AFP/Getty Images)

What Prince Charles and Camilla say and do over the next three days will be under scrutiny, as the couple make their first visit to Canada in five years, carrying out the first official visit by a member of the Royal Family to the country since a greater societal reckoning with our past and our institutions has taken hold.

CBC readers have also told us they are interested in seeing how the royals will deal with current issues, such as Indigenous concerns, the environment and the relevance of the institution in the future — along with how Charles himself will handle all that.

Time to reflect

Underlying this, however, is also the extent to which Canadians spend much time even thinking about the monarchy.

"Honestly, I don't think they give it much of a thought," said Nathan Tidridge, vice-president of the Institute for the Study of the Crown in Canada.

"At moments like a royal visit or the Platinum Jubilee, I think it kind of bubbles to the surface. But typically, it's kind of a perennial conversation: Do we need the institution?"

But Canadians may be thinking more about it this week, and as attention focuses in early June on the Platinum Jubilee, marking Queen Elizabeth's 70 years as monarch.

"It's these kinds of markers that happen that cause people to reflect," said Tidridge.

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Prince Charles, accompanied by Camilla, signs a guest book at Canada House. (Hannah McKay/Getty Images)

"We're also at a very critical time, I think, in the world. We're talking about colonialism, we're talking about systemic racism, we're talking about all these really, really important issues and problems in our society. And the Crown, as that pre-eminent symbol, is implicated in them."

That's because the Crown is "reflecting our society," said Tidridge.

"The Crown is an inanimate object, right," he said. "Sometimes it's easy to just pick on the system, not talk about the society itself. This is an opportunity to do that."

'Showcase the evolution of our country'

This week's trip will take Charles and Camilla from St. John's to Ottawa and then to Yellowknife on Thursday.

Gov. Gen. Mary Simon has said she is looking forward to welcoming the couple.

"This visit is a chance for us to showcase the evolution of our country, our diverse and inclusive society, as well as the resilience of Indigenous communities," she said in a statement as the visit was announced.

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Prince Charles greets people during his visit to Canada House. (Hannah McKay/The Associated Press)

Nicholas Kaizer, a 28-year-old high school teacher in Halifax who describes himself as pro-monarchy and an environmentalist, says he's excited at the prospect of the visit.

Kaizer is hoping "to see an honest reflection on the part of the Prince of Wales on the people he's meeting and the cultures he's experiencing and the legacy they are a witness to."

"I do not want the monarchy to exist in a time capsule; to pretend things are always fine and have been," he said.

"If Canada is going to move forward, and move forward with a monarchical system — and I think it should — that system needs to be honest about the baggage that it brings with it."

Others, like Tom Freda, co-founder of Citizens for a Canadian Republic, don't want Canada to keep its current connection with the Crown. His group wants to instead see the governor general evolve into the country's official head of state.

From Freda's perspective, it's hard to say what is at stake during this royal visit.

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Artist Rosemarie Péloquin made this bust of Prince Charles out of wool. He will be introduced to the life-size, hand-needle-felted bust of his own visage as he meets with Canadian wool enthusiasts in St. John's on Tuesday. (Natasha Hudson/Twitter)

"I don't want to predict what Canadians' views will be at the end of it, but … I don't envy [Charles and Camilla]. Because Prince William and Kate got an unexpected negative reception when they went to the Caribbean," Freda said in an interview.

"That certainly was not in the cards. They were there to help shore up support for the monarchy and everywhere they went, there were demonstrations. So if that's going to happen here, I would say, as was the case with William and Kate, it would be damaging to the monarchy."

Whatever happens on the trip, Freda said, "every step of the way, it will be managed by the Canadian government and everything that they say will be approved of, if not written, by the Canadian government.

"Sometimes they go off script and we'll have to see how far Prince Charles goes with that."

Tidridge, who teaches high school history, civics and Indigenous studies in Waterdown, Ont., said he'll be listening closely to the speeches by Simon and Prince Charles throughout the visit.

"His speeches are vetted by the Government of Canada, but … I'll be interested in the language he chooses and the interactions between himself and Indigenous folks, and the environmental groups, and the military people he will be encountering on the tour," said Tidridge.

As closely as he'll be watching the visit, Tidridge isn't sure what its overall significance might ultimately be, particularly because of its duration.

"I wish that the tour was longer so that we could actually see … a significance develop," he said.

"It's such a whistlestop tour — as determined by the Government of Canada, not the Prince of Wales — that I worry it won't allow for … that kind of marinating that's needed; that time that's needed with the elders and Indigenous leaders for something of significance to happen."

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Prince Charles and Camilla watch Canada Day celebrations on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on July 1, 2017, during their last visit to Canada. (Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

From Empringham's perspective, quick sessions between Charles and whomever he's meeting could provide the beginning of a dialogue — but only that.

"A 15- to 20-minute meeting could be a start of a conversation, but it clearly can't be the end of it, or else there will probably be no action … that will be done," he said. "Other than a cool photo."

From his perspective, what's at stake here is the current state of the environment and the impact of any potential failure to act.

"I think what a lot of young people are attuned to is the IPCC reports that are getting more and more alarming as time goes on," he said. "What's at stake is inaction. I think that's the bluntest way I could put it."

While it's "cool to hear" Prince Charles will be talking about the environment while he's in Canada, Empringham sees the potential for apprehension about just what the ultimate impact might be.

"I think there's a big part of anyone who's been a part of this, even for five or 10 years, [who] would go: 'Oh yes, OK, great,' " Empringham said. But there would also be a sense of "we'll see what happens."

"You want something to happen, and you're hopeful,"  Empringham said, but there's an "optimistic skepticism, is almost the way I would put it."

"There's probably a little bit of trepidation that people would go into a meeting like that, not knowing if anything will actually come of it."

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A royal visit at a time of reckoning: Will Prince Charles and Camilla connect with Canadians?

3-day tour kicks off Tuesday in St. John's, before the couple travels to Ottawa, N.W.T


https://i.cbc.ca/1.6421413.1650052495!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/original_1180/805371766.jpg

Prince Charles and Camilla watch Canada Day celebrations on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on July 1, 2017, during their last visit to Canada. (Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

From Empringham's perspective, quick sessions between Charles and whomever he's meeting could provide the beginning of a dialogue — but only that.

Perhaps mumbling and quite uneasy; with little to no connection with Canadians; struggling to understand the reason/purpose for their visit to Canada.

Demerara_Guy

Indigenous Canadians make a painful plea on eve of British royal visit

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Britain's Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall visit Canada House in London, Britain May 12, 2022. REUTERS/Hannah McKay/Pool

May 16 (Reuters) - As Britain's Prince Charles and his wife Camilla prepare to visit Canada this week, some members of the indigenous community are calling on the British royal family to formally acknowledge the harm colonization did to First Nations people.

The royal couple will arrive in St. Johns, Newfoundland on Tuesday on a three-day trip that will include stops in Ottawa and the Northwest Territories and focus on the issues of reconciliation with indigenous peoples and climate change.

The impact of colonization, the residential school system and the loss of lands is what the crown represents, Mary Teegee, the executive director of child and family services at Carrier Sekani Family Services in the province of British Columbia, told Reuters.

"They also have to understand that they are not the leaders in our nation," Teegee said, adding that recognition of the harms of colonization are needed rather than just a "trite" apology.

Although Canada ceased being a colony of Britain in 1867, it remained a member of the British Empire, with a British-appointed governor-general acting on behalf of the monarch.

And it was under the guise of the crown and Canada's federal government that some 150,000 indigenous children were forcibly removed from their families and enrolled in a Christian-run network of residential schools between 1831 and 1996.

That policy, described by some as a form of cultural genocide, and survivors' accounts of harsh, paramilitary-like conditions have been under the microscope since the discovery in 2021 of the remains of more than 200 children buried in unmarked areas on the grounds of one such school in B.C.

CBC News on Monday quoted Cassidy Caron, the president of the Métis National Council, an indigenous group, as saying Queen Elizabeth should apologize to the residential school survivors.

Caron said she plans to deliver that message when she meets Charles, the heir to the British throne, and Camilla during their visit, which is part of the Platinum Jubilee celebrations marking the queen's seven decades on the throne.

'DISTANT ALIEN THING'

Jess Housty, a community organizer for the Heiltsuk Nation in B.C., said that while she doesn't care about the visit, it's hard to ignore the colonial past and the "bad relations that have happened for centuries."

The monarchy is "this distant alien thing that feels really irrelevant in my life and work," Housty said.

An opinion poll released by the Angus Reid research group in April shows support among Canadians to abolish the country's constitutional monarchy rising, with about 51% saying it should disappear in coming generations, up from 45% in January 2020.

While acknowledging there were a lot of people in her community who didn't actively support the monarchy, Housty conceded that many had been excited when Britain's Prince William and his wife Kate visited her area in 2016.

That excitement is on display once again this week, said St. John's Mayor Danny Breen, who told Reuters that the province of Newfoundland and Labrador is looking forward to the arrival of Charles and Camilla.

"People have respect for the queen and have respect for the family," Breen said.

Demerara_Guy

Indigenous Canadians make a painful plea on eve of British royal visit

May 16 (Reuters) - As Britain's Prince Charles and his wife Camilla prepare to visit Canada this week, some members of the indigenous community are calling on the British royal family to formally acknowledge the harm colonization did to First Nations people.

While acknowledging there were a lot of people in her community who didn't actively support the monarchy, Housty conceded that many had been excited when Britain's Prince William and his wife Kate visited her area in 2016.

That excitement is on display once again this week, said St. John's Mayor Danny Breen, who told Reuters that the province of Newfoundland and Labrador is looking forward to the arrival of Charles and Camilla.

"People have respect for the queen and have respect for the family," Breen said.

Respect indeed for the Queen.

The other members of the Royal Family --- highly questionable.

Demerara_Guy
Last edited by Demerara_Guy

Perhaps mumbling and quite uneasy; with little to no connection with Canadians; struggling to understand the reason/purpose for their visit to Canada.

@Mitwah posted:

Who is paying for their visit?

Mitwah --- Payments are made by the Canadian government, provincial governments  where they visit, etc., for these visits by the royal family. The current total amount would be known after the final tally is made after the visit.

For example, most recent cost ---

in 2017, was about Can. $$ 488,000.00.

in 2016, was about Can. $$ 2,000,000.00.

Demerara_Guy
@cain posted:

Dem rass know how fo spend taxpayer money. The Prince and Dutchess of Cornondacob coulda done a facetime on Messenger and accomplished the same.

Freebies, Cain .... freebies ...

Perhaps, this chap will look everywhere to enjoy freebies from others.

Perhaps, he should stay at home and wear his skirts; which are shorter that his wife's.

Kilt-wearing Highland soldier catches up with the times and avoids embarrassing the Queen

Demerara_Guy
Last edited by Demerara_Guy

look at de old & ugly Royal murderers in their skirts! dey used Diana as de virgin bride to produce 2 royal male heirs, murdered her, & carrying on now like she never existed...

IA
Last edited by Irfon Ali

Mitwah --- Payments are made by the Canadian government, provincial governments  where they visit, etc., for these visits by the royal family. The current total amount would be known after the final tally is made after the visit.

For example, most recent cost ---

in 2017, was about Can. $$ 488,000.00.

in 2016, was about Can. $$ 2,000,000.00.

What a bunch of free loaders. This money could have gone to help starving families.

Mitwah
@Irfon Ali posted:

look at de old & ugly Royal murderers in their skirts! dey used Diana as de virgin bride to produce 2 royal male heirs, murdered her, & carrying on now like she never existed...

In Guyanese lingo, they would be called 'barnacles".

Mitwah

Camilla Parker Bowles can’t stop talking about Joe Biden’s ‘long fart’

President Biden let out a long, loud fart while speaking with the Duchess of Cornwall at the COP26 summit.

Camilla Parker Bowles “hasn’t stopped talking about” the 78-year-old’s “long fart,” it has been reported.

The pair were making small talk at the global climate change gathering in Scotland last week when the president broke wind, according to an informed source who spoke to the Mail on Sunday.

“It was long and loud and impossible to ignore,” the source told the outlet.

“Camilla hasn’t stopped talking about it.”

Biden met the Duchess during a reception on Monday at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery, attended by Prince Charles, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

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The Duchess of Cornwall and President Biden were making small talk at the global climate change summit when the president reportedly farted.Chris Jackson/WPA Pool/Getty Images

Parker Bowles, who has been married to Prince Charles since 2005, was taken aback by the flatulence.

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President Biden and Camilla Parker Bowles at the COP26 summit.Getty Images

Hours earlier, Biden appeared to nod off during opening remarks at the climate change conference.

At one point, Biden closed his eyes for 22 seconds before an aide appeared to wake him up.

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President Biden appeared to nod off while listening to a climate speech in Glasgow last week.Reuters

Biden could not keep his eyes open while listening to Eddie Ndopu, a disability rights activist, who began losing the president as he warned that global warming threatened “our ability to grow food and even to survive.”

Biden is the oldest-ever US president and turns 79 this month.

Demerara_Guy

Camilla Parker Bowles can’t stop talking about Joe Biden’s ‘long fart’

President Biden let out a long, loud fart while speaking with the Duchess of Cornwall at the COP26 summit.

Camilla Parker Bowles “hasn’t stopped talking about” the 78-year-old’s “long fart,” it has been reported.

The pair were making small talk at the global climate change gathering in Scotland last week when the president broke wind, according to an informed source who spoke to the Mail on Sunday.

“It was long and loud and impossible to ignore,” the source told the outlet.

“Camilla hasn’t stopped talking about it.”

Biden met the Duchess during a reception on Monday at the Kelvingrove Art Gallery, attended by Prince Charles, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Perhaps, President Biden was communicating to her; in a diplomatic manner; to get lost.

Demerara_Guy

Prince Charles Passes Gas on Regina Tarmac

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As Prince Charles (64) and the Duchess of Cornwall (65) prepared to depart Canada after a whirlwind tour, guests and security personnel seeing the Royal couple off were taken aback when the Prince passed “loud and pungent” gas while boarding their RCAF jet for the flight back to London.

The moment froze the group of politicians, media and other well-wishers, the silence only broken by Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall nervously laughing in a high pitch and then coughing into his hand. Caught on video, the 42-second clip has since appeared on YouTube and David Letterman has issued a statement that The Late Show will feature “The Top Ten Things To Say When Royalty Farts” this weekend.

Wearing a dark, tailored Burberry suit and an Aquascutum trench coat, the Prince motioned with his hand as if to wave the moment away and then began to climb the stairs onto the plane.  The Duchess, Camilla, followed him with her shoulders visibally shaking from laughter.

“In some cultures, flatulence is considered a compliment to the chef,” said Robert Finch, Chair and CEO of The Monarchist League of Canada.  “We take this as a Royal compliment to Canada’s fine food.”

The Prince and his Royal entourage had dined earlier with a group of high-school students at a Royal Jubilee Awards banquet that featured western Canadian foods including British Columbia salmon, Alberta beef, Winnipeg Goldeye fish, and Saskatchewan corn.

“The Top Ten Things to Say When Royalty Farts”  Letterman

The Prince and Duchess had spent a largely uneventful day in Regina prior to the gaseous departure, with the Prince praising the city of 200,000 as a community that would make his great-grandmother proud.  In 1882, Regina was named after Queen Victoria (Victoria Regina) replacing its original name, Pile-of-Bones (really!).  The city is also historically remembered for the hanging of Metis leader Louis Riel who famously “made rebellious wind” as he was marched to his execution.

“Who hasn’t tried to slip a quiet one by?” said Ray Boughton, Conservative MP, in attendance on the tarmac.  “Okay this one wasn’t quiet but the Prince felt comfortable enough in Canada to fluff one out…so what?”

Liberal MP Ralph Goodale says he took a quick step up-wind and says it was “a funny international mini-event blown out of proportion”.  Grinning at reporters as the doors of the aircraft closed, Goodale said, “He farted.  It smelled.  End of story. I know the Parti Quebecois will crap all over this and spin it as an insult.  It wasn’t…it was just a ploot.  Hell, even the Dalai Lama ploots.”

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who did a street walkabout with the Prince and stopped at a sidewalk vendor for hot dog smokies, said, “Hell yeah he gassed it up…so did the Duchess.  He had saurkraut on his dog and I coulda warned him about that.”

Buckingham Palace did not respond to a request for comment but House of Windsor advisor Lord Winston Tottering cited historical protocol dating back to King Henry VIII that makes reference to “Regal air tulips”.

Regal air tulips may well be one of Letterman’s Top Ten.

Demerara_Guy
Last edited by Demerara_Guy

A royal visit at a time of reckoning: Will Prince Charles and Camilla connect with Canadians?

3-day tour kicks off Tuesday in St. John's, before the couple travels to Ottawa, N.W.T


https://i.cbc.ca/1.6450848.1652374828!/cpImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/original_1180/britain-royals.jpg

Prince Charles greets people during his visit to Canada House. (Hannah McKay/The Associated Press)

Perhaps he was happily saying to the crowd, with a huge grin ...

"Fart free wherever you be

Fart will not cause the death of me."

Demerara_Guy
Last edited by Demerara_Guy

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